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Doctor Thyroid

Welcome to Doctor Thyroid with your host, Philip James. This is a meeting place for you to hear from top thyroid doctors and healthcare professionals. Information here is intended to help those wanting to 'thrive' regardless of setbacks related to thyroid cancer. Seeking good health information can be a challenge, hopefully this resource provides you with better treatment alternatives as related to endocrinology, surgery, hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, functional medicine, pathology, and radiation treatment. Not seeing an episode that addresses your particular concern? Please send me an email with your interest, and I will request an interview with a leading expert to help address your questions. Philip James philipjames@docthyroid.com
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Now displaying: September, 2017
Sep 29, 2017

Dr. Paul Y. Casanova-Romero, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.E, E.C.N.U, que se unió a Palm Beach Diabetes y Endocrine Specialists en 2012, recibió su grado médico con honores (Summa Cum Laude) y Doctor en Ciencias Médicas (DMSc), de la Universidad de Zulia, la Escuela de Medicina en Venezuela. Posteriormente se unió a la facultad de su Alma Mater y en 1998, el Grupo de Investigación del Programa de Prevención de la Diabetes (D.P.P.) en el Instituto de Investigación de la Diabetes-Universidad de Miami. Completó su posgrado en Medicina Interna y Endocrinología (Jackson Memorial Hospital) y estudios de postgrado en Salud Pública (M.P.H.) con el Premio de Mérito Académico en la Universidad de Miami.

Un consultor privado endocrinólogo y orador nacional desde 2006, el Dr. Paul Y. Casanova-Romero de investigación extensa sobre la prevención de la diabetes, trastornos de la tiroides, síndrome metabólico y otros trastornos endocrinos han sido ampliamente publicadas. Sigue colaborando en estudios de investigación en Estados Unidos y Latinoamérica, el más reciente en pruebas moleculares de tiroides. El Dr. Casanova-Romero está certificado por la Junta en Medicina Interna, así como en Endocrinología, Diabetes y Metabolismo. Es miembro del Colegio Americano de Endocrinología (F.A.C.E.) y miembro del Colegio Americano de Médicos (F.A.C.P.). Actualmente es profesor voluntario de medicina en la Universidad de Miami.

Dr. Paul Y. Casanova-Romero se especializa en el tratamiento de la enfermedad de la tiroides incluyendo nódulos tiroideos, hipotiroidismo, hipertiroidismo y cáncer de tiroides, enfermedad paratiroidea, diabetes, pre-diabetes, trastornos lipídicos y otros trastornos endocrinos. Él ha estado usando la prueba molecular para la caracterización de los nódulos de la tiroides desde 2010. Él ha satisfecho con éxito los requisitos para la certificación endocrina en el ultrasonido del cuello (ECNU) para realizar la biopsia internamente guiada por ultrasonido de la aspiración de la aguja fina de nódulos de tiroides, de la paratiroides, nodos.

Es miembro del panel de membresía de la American Thyroid Association, miembro activo de la Endocrine Society, la Asociación Americana de Endocrinólogos Clínicos, la American Diabetes Association, el American College of Physicians y la National Lipid Association.

En esta entrevista hablamos sobre esta temas:

  • ¿Cómo se identifican los nódulos y por qué ocurren? autoexamen o en la oficina del médico
  • La mayoría de los nódulos son benignos pero ocurren porque en mas de 70% de la población
  • ¿Qué tests puede realizar un médico para evaluar el nódulo?
  • Ninguna test es 100%
  • Ultrasonido - qué están buscando en general
  • Que es ojo fina y el proceso general
  • Tests moleculares
  • ¿Qué tipos de resultados se pueden obtener de la citología y qué significan?
  • La mayoria de ojo finas son benigno
  • Maligno o sospechoso de malignidad, todavía tiene la posibilidad de no ser cáncer
  • Los arco iris - 3,4,5 - indeterminate categoria 
  • Systema BETHESDA
  • ¿Qué tests adicionales se pueden realizar para resolver los nódulos indeterminados? - Tests moleculares
  • Que son todas los tests moleculares?  Y son las mismas?
  • Dr. Casanova prefiere usar test de Afirma, este es por que

MAS INFORMACIÓN

Dr. Paul Casanova

American Thyroid Association (español)

La prueba de la expresión génica de Afirma puede reducir cirugías innecesarias del cáncer de tiroides

Afirma

Sep 28, 2017

Dr. Bridget Brady is Austin’s first fellowship trained endocrine surgeon. She has a passion for and expertise in disease of the thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal glands. Since completing her endocrine surgery fellowship in 2006 under Matthias Rothmund, MD, an internationally acclaimed endocrine surgeon, she has performed thousands of thyroidectomies and parathyroidectomies here in Austin. Dr. Brady focuses on a variety of minimally invasive techniques to optimize patients’ medical and cosmetic outcomes. Her fellowship training in Germany and experience in Austin have enabled her to specialize in patients with recurrent or persistent disease of the thyroid and parathyroid, including thyroid cancer. She offers complete diagnostic workups including in-office ultrasounds and FNA biopsies of thyroid nodules and lymph nodes.

Dr. Brady was named director of endocrine surgery for the new medical school in Austin. She was also recently chosen to teach general surgeons seeking additional training in endocrine surgery. Dr. Brady instructs these endocrine surgeons from the Baylor Scott and White fellowship program.

In this episode the following topics are discussed:

  • Austin Thyroid Surgeons sees 30 patients per week with thyroid nodules
  • Up to 80% of US population could have a thyroid nodule(s)
  • less than 5% of Dr Brady's thyroid nodule patients test positive for cancer
  • How relevant is what I don’t know won’t hurt me in thyroid cancer and biopsies of nodules?
  • BETHESDA system or the middle category, also known as indeterminate
  • For thyroid nodules that are indeterminate, historically a surgery would be performed 
  • With molecular testing, surgery can be decreased by up to 50%
  • Afirma molecular testing uses messenger RNA
  • If Afirma comes back suspicious it does NOT necessarily mean it is cancer
  • Insurance covers molecular testing
  • Nest steps for a doctor who would like to incorporate molecular testing
  • Suspicious results with molecular testing can still be benign on final pathology
  • How do you calmly tell a patient they have cancer?

NOTES

Dr. Bridget Brady

Veracyte

American Thyroid Association

 

Sep 25, 2017

Dr. Lisa Sardinia is an associate professor in the Pacific University Biology Department. She received a B.S. in Biology from Whitworth College, a Ph.D. in Microbiology from Montana State University and a J.D. from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law.  

Following graduate school, she was awarded a National Cancer Institute research fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco studying molecular genetics.

At Pacific University, she teaches Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Basic Science for Optometry and Human Genetics for Physician Assistants. She has been the recipient of the Thomas J. and Joyce Holce Endowed Professorship in Science and the S.S. Johnson Foundation Award for Excellence in Teaching at Pacific University.

In the episode, we discuss:

  • Microbiome
  • Microbes inside the gut
  • Gut microbe biota
  • 95% of serotonin manufactured in gut
  • Dark chocolate and bacteria in your gut
  • Probiotics
  • Prebiotics are food that we eat that has food for good bacteria
  • Soluble fiber
  • Eat food that feeds your gut bacteria
  • Whole grains, black beans, cruciferous vegetables
  • Dark chocolate benefit – the darker the better
  • Most disruptive to gut biome is antibiotics
  • Danger: antibiotics with children
  • Majority of antibiotics given to children under three are for upper respiratory issues, fact is antibiotics do not work for such issues
  • 85% of antibiotics used are given to food sources, and released into the environment including soil and water
  • Danger of consuming emulsifiers
  • Cow’s milk
  • US has low gut diversity — more diversity means more resilience
  • Autism and gut connection
  • Resetting your gut microbiota by changing diet
  • The importance of starting kids out with the right food
  • Inflammatory disease is seen less in underdeveloped countries
  • Avoid emulsifiers, additives, and artificial sweeteners


NOTES
The American Gut

Michael Pollan ‘Some of My Best Friends Are Germs’

An Epidemic of Absence

How Emulsifiers Are Messing with Our Guts (and Making Us Fat)

Sep 24, 2017

Dr. Susanne Breen is a board certified naturopathic physician. She completed her medical training at the National University of Natural Medicine (NUNM) after initial medical studies at the Oregon Health Sciences University in conventional medicine.  Healing, she discovered, required more than medication or even natural remedies. Her inspiration came from her advanced studies at NUNM in gastroenterology, including Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO), where she learned about the root causes of her personal health challenges. She read Breaking the Vicious Cycle, changed her diet, found direction from practitioners and started her path to health. She brings her personal experience and training to help others do the same.

Dr. Breen completed a residency with Dr. Gary Weiner at Pearl Natural Health and continues to see patients at this location.  Her training and expertise in the areas of IBD/IBS, thyroid health, bio-identical hormones, gynecology, IV therapy, herbal, nutritional and lifestyle changes offers people a holistic, integrative and comprehensive model of care.

Dr. Breen is a wife and mother of two children.  She enjoys living in the Pacific Northwest where she hikes, snow skis, and gardens.  She has a special love for animals, including her two cats, fermented foods and Tabata workouts.

In this episode, the following topics are discussed:

  • Fatigue, hair loss, weight gain, anxiety, and depression.
  • Sub-clinical hypothyroidism
  • Standard range for TSH has changed over the years, .5 - 1.5 TSH is optimal
  • Armour Thyroid vs Levothyroxine
  • If antibodies are involved than it is most likely related to the gut
  • Getting off thyroid medication
  • Testing: TSH, free T3 T4, TPO antibodies, reverse T3
  • Getting motivated and inspired by fixing thyroid
  • Selenium
  • Iodine
  • Thyroid supplements
  • Treating fertility
  • Hair loss and levothyoxine
  • Joint pain and levothyroxine 
  • Nature vs Armour
  • Magnesium interfering with T4
  • Analysis of gut and assessment: bad breath, burping, etc.
  • Stool testing for SIBO
  • Progesterone and testosterone
  • Testing for adrenal fatigue through saliva throughout the day
  • Cortisol secretion related to grief or stress
  • Desiccated bovine adrenal
  • Graves’ disease and testosterone fix
  • Breath tests and pathogens
  • Microflora
  • Digestive and thyroid health are connected
  • Bowel movement frequency and constipation
  • Whole foods and unprocessed foods
  • Sugar, inflammation, and heart disease
  • Homemade yogurt and cow’s milk and removing lactose, fixing bloating
  • Food allergy testing
  • Achy joints, painful feet, anemia, cramping, testosterone and estrogen, neuro-therapy, ozone therapy, acupuncture, blood flow, dizziness, hydration, lyme disease, and muscle spasms.

NOTES:

Mysymotoms.com

Susanne Breen, N.D.

Sep 20, 2017

Dr. Gerard Doherty, an acclaimed endocrine surgeon, is a graduate of Holy Cross and the Yale School of Medicine. He completed residency training at UCSF, including Medical Staff Fellowship at the National Cancer Institute.  Dr. Doherty joined Washington University School of Medicine in 1993, and became Professor of Surgery in 2001. In 2002 he became Head of General Surgery and the Norman W. Thompson Professor of Surgery at the University of Michigan, where he also served as the General Surgery Program Director and Vice Chair of the Department of Surgery. From 2012 to 2016, Dr. Doherty was the Utley Professor and Chair of Surgery at Boston University and Surgeon-in-Chief at Boston Medical Center before becoming Moseley Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, and Surgeon-in-Chief at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. 

Dr. Doherty was trained in Surgical Oncology, and has practiced the breadth of that specialty, including as founder and co-director of the Breast Health Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.  His clinical and administrative work was integral in the establishment of the Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University.  Since joining the University of Michigan in 2002, he has focused mainly on surgical diseases of the thyroid, parathyroid, endocrine pancreas and adrenal glands as well as the surgical management of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndromes. He has devoted substantial effort to medical student and resident education policy.  His bibliography includes over 300 peer-reviewed articles, reviews and book chapters, and several edited books.  

He currently serves as President of the International Association of Endocrine Surgeons, Past-President of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons, Editor-in-Chief of VideoEndocrinology and Reviews Editor of JAMA Surgery.  He is a director of the Surgical Oncology Board of the American Board of Surgery.

In this episode, the following topics are discussed:

  • Imaging has increased thyroid nodule discovery.
  • Following patients with small thyroid cancer — analogous to prostate cancer.  Better followed than treated.
  • Tiny thyroid cancers can be defined by those nodules less than 1/4 inch in size. 
  • Less RAI is being used as a part of thyroid cancer treatment. This means, less need to do total thyroidectomy or thyroid lobectomy.   
  • Dry mouth and dry eyes are risks to doing RAI.  Also, there is risk to developing a second malignancy.   Most of the secondary cancers are leukemia.
  • Risks to operation include changes to voice and calcium levels.  Thyroid surgery is a safe operation but not risk free.
  • Best question for a patient to ask is, who is my treatment team?
  • The quarterback of treatment team is often the endocrinologist .
  • Cluster of issues can happen after RAI, such as the need to carry water and eye drops for life.
  • For some patients taking thyroid hormone replacement, their blood levels are correct, but still does not feel well on standard treatment protocol.
  • By the end of two weeks, most people go back to what they were doing before surgery with a relatively normal state.
  • Scarring reduction; massage, aloe, Vitamin E.

NOTES:

American Association of Endocrine Surgeons

American Thyroid Association

Sep 18, 2017

Dr. Alan Farwell is an endocrinologist, Director of the Endocrine Clinics at Boston Medical Center, and Associate Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, in Massachusetts.

In addition to his extensive academic and clinical activities, Dr. Farwell has been extremely active and served in multiple capacities in the ATA, including as Chair of the Education Committee and the Patient Education and Advocacy Committee, and as a member of the Program Committee and the Website Task Force Publications Committee. He has served two terms on the ATA Board of Directors, is the founding and current Chair of the ATA Alliance for Patient Education. 

Dr. Farwell has been an Associate Editor and member of the Editorial Board of Thyroid, and since 2009 has been Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Thyroidology for the Public.

In this interview, we discuss the following topics:

  • Thyroid surgery and RAI sometimes results in hypothyroidism
  • Most common cause is Hashimoto’s disease
  • Explanation of overactive and underactive thyroid
  • Weight gain, dry skin, constipation
  • Very few symptoms unique to hypothyroidism
  • Sleep apnea and being tired all of the time and weight gain.
  • Brain fog and difficulty concentrating
  • Blood tests diagnose hypothyroidism based on TSH levels, when elevated means it is not working too well.
  • Explaining TSH in laymen’s terms
  • Normal TSH in the U.S. is .3 to 3.5
  • Treating for feel rather than a number
  • People with elevated TSH have many of the hypothyroid symptoms, but people with normal TSH levels may also have hypothyroid symptoms
  • Sleep disturbances such as apnea and anemia can be disguised as hypothyroidism
  • Historical explanation of hypothyroidism treatment
  • About 10% of patients do not respond to Levothyroxin
  • Explanation of desiccated thyroid, including pig and cow
  • Dr. Jacqueline Jonklaas, PCORI Grant will look at a study, head to head, Levothyroxin versus desiccated
  • Adding T3 to T4 treatment
  • Discussing Dr. Bianco’s research and deiodinases enzyme
  • A discussion of celiac disease and gluten
  • Explanation of auto-immune disorders, where the thyroid is attacked by the bodies own antibodies
  • Physical symptoms of hypothyroidism are goiters, sluggishness, fatigue, dry skin, lateral eyebrows to disappear, the tongue can get thick, puffiness, swelling in legs, face, and around eyes.  With proper treatment, these are reversible.

NOTES

Dr. Antonio Bianco

Dr. Jacqueline Jonklaas

American Thyroid Association

Sep 10, 2017

Dr. Wartofsky is Professor of Medicine, Georgetown University School of Medicine and Chairman Emeritus, Department of Medicine, MedStar Washington Hospital Center.  He trained in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital, Washington University and in endocrinology with Dr. Sidney Ingbar, Harvard University Service, Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Boston.   Dr. Wartofsky is past President of both the American Thyroid Association and The Endocrine Society.  He is the editor of books on thyroid cancer for both physicians and for patients, and thyroid cancer is his primary clinical focus.   He is the author or coauthor of over 350 articles and book chapters in the medical literature, is recent past Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, and is the current Editor-in-Chief of Endocrine Reviews.

In this episode, Dr. Wartofsky discusses the following:

  • Hypothyroidism causes
  • When is replacement thyroid hormone necessary?
  • The history of replacement thyroid hormone going back to 1891
  • The early treatment included a chopped up sheep thyroid and served as a ‘tartar’, often resulting in vomiting
  • Myxedema coma
  • The danger of taking generic T4; are cheaper, larger profit margin, but the content varies.
  • Synthroid versus generic
  • Manufacturing plants in Italy, India, Puerto Rico are known to produce generics
  • Content versus absorption when taking generic T4
  • An explanation of TSH
  • 1.39 is a healthy TSH level for women in the U.S.
  • Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as a slow mind, poor memory, dry skin, brittle hair, slow heart rate, problems with pregnancy, miscarriage, and hypertension.
  • Screening TSH levels if contemplating pregnancy
  • T4 is the most prescribed drug in the U.S.
  • Hypothyroidism is common when there is a family history
  • Auto-immune disease is often associated with hypothyroidism
  • An explanation of T3
  • An explanation of desiccated thyroid
  • The T3 ‘buzz’
  • Muhammed Ali’s overdose of T3
  • Dangers of too much T3
  • When to take T4 medication, and caution toward taking mediations that interfere with absorption
  • Coffee and thyroid hormone absorption
  • Losing muscle and bone by taking too much thyroid hormone
  • Taking ownership of your disease

Related episodes:

37: Adding T3 to T4 Will Make You Feel Better? For Some the Answer is ‘Yes’ with Dr. Antonio Bianco from Rush University

NOTES

Leonard Wartofsky

American Thyroid Association

 

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