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Doctor Thyroid

Welcome to Doctor Thyroid with your host, Philip James. This is a meeting place for you to hear from top thyroid doctors and healthcare professionals. Information here is intended to help those wanting to 'thrive' regardless of setbacks related to thyroid cancer. Seeking good health information can be a challenge, hopefully this resource provides you with better treatment alternatives as related to endocrinology, surgery, hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, functional medicine, pathology, and radiation treatment. Not seeing an episode that addresses your particular concern? Please send me an email with your interest, and I will request an interview with a leading expert to help address your questions. Philip James philipjames@docthyroid.com
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Now displaying: August, 2017
Aug 29, 2017

Dr. José A. Hakim realiza más de 400 cirugías al año. Es cirujano general. Especialista en cirugía de cabeza y cuello en relación con el cáncer.

En este entrevista, hablamos sobre:

  • No todos los cánceres de tiroides deben ser operados.
  • No todos los nódulos tiroideos deben ser biopsiados.
  • La mitad de la población tiene nódulos tiroideos. El 10% de esos nódulos tienen cáncer. En Colombia, 2,5 millones de personas tienen cáncer de tiroides. 15 millones de personas tienen cáncer de tiroides en los Estados Unidos, y lo más probable es que no lo sepan.
  • Los estudios muestran que el 30% de los cadáveres tienen nódulos tiroideos con cáncer.
  • Comprender las repercusiones de hacer una biopsia. Si se trata de un nódulo que no requiere cirugía, incluso si es cáncer, decirle a un paciente esto a veces hace más daño en la forma de estrés emocional que lo que es necesario.
  • No sacrificar una tiroides debido a la fobia.
  • La carga es en el médico para no desencadenar paranoia y estrés en el paciente diciéndoles que "podría" tener cáncer, en el caso de llevar a cabo una biopsia en un nódulo cuando no es necesario.
  • Una tiroidectomía cambia una vida, incluyendo la piel seca, aumento de peso, calcio, pérdida de voz o cambio de voz - estos pueden ser peores que vivir con cáncer de tiroides papilar.
  • ¿Qué necesita ocurrir en la comunidad médica para cambiar el paradigma que no necesitamos para operar en todo el cáncer de tiroides?
  • La patología es la clave para cambiar el paradigma.
  • El cáncer no es igual en todos los casos. Piense en el cáncer de tiroides similar a la vista sobre el cáncer de próstata en los hombres.
Aug 25, 2017

Dr. Shaha specializes in head and neck surgery, with a particular interest in thyroid and parathyroid surgery. He uses an algorithm of selective thyroid tumor criteria (the size, location, stage and type of cancer, along with the patient’s age), to tailor therapy to each individual’s circumstances. This can help thyroid cancer patients avoid unnecessary and potentially damaging over-treatment, while still providing the best option for control of their cancer and better quality of life after treatment. Dr. Shaha works very closely with Memorial Sloan Ketterings’ endocrinologists to monitor the careful post-treatment hormone balancing necessary for thyroid cancer patients. Many academic hospitals and medical societies worldwide have invited Dr. Shaha to speak on the principles of targeted thyroid surgery and to share his expertise in the treatment of head and neck cancers.

 

In this interview, topics include:

  • The first question a surgeon should ask and why.
  • When talking active surveillance or observation, changing the language to deferred intervention,  ‘we are going to defer’.
  • Understanding the biology of the cancer
  • The biology of thyroid cancer is a friendly cancer.
  • Anxiety when diagnosed with cancer.
  • Medical legalities — spend a lot of time with patient — and empower patient.
  • Let the treatment not be worse than the disease.
  • Large tumors, more than 4 cm,  bulky nodes,  voice hoarseness,  vocal cord is paralyzed.  All circumstances where surgery maybe advocated.
  • If a tumor is benign but there is presence of compressive goiters, or deviation of trachea or swallowing difficulty.
  • Considering the condition of the patient, age, cardiac issues.
  • When voice is critical to the patients livelihood, such as teachers, politicians, and singers.
  • Main three complications of surgery include bleeding, change of voice, calcium problems.
  • Non-academic surgeons.
  • Cancer treatment requires a team: surgeons, anesthesiologist, pre-op, radiologist, pathologist, endocrinologists, oncologists.
  • When wind pipe is involved with tumor.
  • When in surgical business a long time, you become humble no matter how good you are.
  • Family present during consultation.
  • God gave you an organ — you took it away — now you are on a pill — since the surgery its ’just’ not the same.
  • When treatment is out of the box — many will not agree with you.
  • How to develop a scale to measure quality of life.
  • To avoid scarring, surgery maybe conducted through the armpit in Korea and Japan.
  • Fibrosis
  • Progress in understanding biology of thyroid cancer only cancer, that there is 98% survival.

NOTES:

Dr. Ashok R. Shaha

 

RELATED EPISODES:

50: Regarding Thyroid Cancer, Are You a Minimalist or a Maximalist? with Dr. Michael Tuttle from Sloan Kettering

40: New Research Reveals Thyroid Surgery Errors 5x More Frequent Than Reported with Dr. Maria Papaleontiou from Michigan Medicine

42: Flame Retardants Connected to Thyroid Cancer, with Dr. Julie Ann Sosa from Duke University

35: Rethinking Thyroid Cancer – When Saying No to Surgery Maybe Best for You with Dr. Allen Ho from Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles

 

21: Diagnosed with Thyroid Cancer and You Say No to Surgery with Dr. Louise Davies

09: Thyroid Cancer Patients Experience Quality of Life Downgrade with Dr. Raymon Grogan and Dr. Briseis Aschebrook from the University of Chicago Medicine

36: 1 in 3 People Die With Thyroid Cancer — Not From with Dr. Seth Landefeld from UAB

 

American Thyroid Association

Aug 18, 2017

Many centers from around the world want to know how Memorial Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center treats thyroid cancer.  A key member of the MSKCC is Dr. Michael Tuttle. 

During this interview, Dr. Tuttle discusses the following points:

  • Challenges of managing thyroid cancer as outlined by the guidelines
  • Scaling back care for insurance-challenged patients, and adopting a plan that gets the same result without needing the expensive tests
  • Desired outcome is survival and no recurrence, a third is for no harm that would be caused by an unnecessary surgery
  • Unwanted side affects of thyroid cancer include nerve damage, parathyroid damage, and infections
  • RAI sometimes has unwanted side affects
  • With technology, ultrasounds and biopsies, we know some cancers do not need to be treated, as they are now being found very early
  • Change in ATA guidelines, low risk cancers can be considered for observation
  • Two different kinds of patient profiles: Minimalist and Maximalist
  • 1cm or 1.5cm?
  • Patient characteristic, ultra sound characteristics, and the medical team characteristics weighs who is the most appropriate for observation
  • 400 active surveillance patients currently at MSKCC
  • Certain parts of the world are harder to offer observation as a treatment due to practicality, examples include Latina America where multi-nodular goiters are common, and Germany still is iodine deficient

About Dr. Tuttle, in his words:

I am a board-certified endocrinologist who specializes in caring for patients with advanced thyroid cancer. I work as part of a multidisciplinary team including surgeons, pathologists, radiologists, nuclear medicine specialists, and radiation oncologists that provides individualized care to patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering for thyroid cancer.

In addition to treating patients I am also actively researching new treatments for advanced thyroid cancer. I am a professor of medicine at the Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University and travel extensively both in the US and abroad, lecturing on the difficult issues that sometimes arise in the management of patients with thyroid cancer. My research projects in radiation-induced thyroid cancer have taken me from Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands to the Hanford Nuclear power-plant in Washington State to regions in Russia that were exposed to fallout from the Chernobyl accident.

I am an active member of the American Thyroid Association (ATA) and the Endocrine Society. In addition to serving on the ATA committee that produced the current guidelines for the management of benign and malignant nodules, I am also a Chairman of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Thyroid Cancer Panel, a consultant to the Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee of the FDA, and a consultant to the Chernobyl Tissue Bank.

  • Clinical Expertise: Thyroid Cancer
  • Languages Spoken: English
  • Education: MD, University of Louisville School of Medicine
  • Residencies: Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center
  • Fellowships: Madigan Army Medical Center
  • Board Certifications: Endocrinology and Metabolism

NOTES

22: Avoiding Thyroid Cancer Surgery, Depending on the Size with Dr. Miyauchi from Kuma Hospital in Kobe, Japan

21: Diagnosed with Thyroid Cancer and You Say No to Surgery with Dr. Louise Davies

35: Rethinking Thyroid Cancer – When Saying No to Surgery Maybe Best for You with Dr. Allen Ho from Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles

The American Thyroid Association

Aug 15, 2017

In this episode, topics include:

  • Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism during pregnancy
  • Pregnant and without a thyroid
  • Avoiding T3 during pregnancy, including concerns with desiccated thyroid
  • If being treated for hypothyroidism already, the importance of upping dose while pregnant
  • Pregnant with auto-immunity
  • Pregnant with Graves’ disease
  • The dangers of pregnancy and overt hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism
  • Three-percent of pregnancies are affected
  • The importance of iodine during pregnancy

Dr. Pearce received her undergraduate and medical degrees from Harvard and a masters’ degree in epidemiology from the Boston University School of Public Health. She completed her residency in internal medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and her fellowship in endocrinology at the Boston University Medical Center. She is currently an Associate Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. She has served as a member of the board of directors of the American Thyroid Association and is currently on the management council of the Iodine Global Network.  She recently co-chaired the ATA’s Thyroid in Pregnancy Guidelines Task Force. She was the 2011 recipient of the ATA’s Van Meter Award for outstanding contributions to research on the thyroid gland.

NOTES

Elizabeth Pearce

American Thyroid Association

Aug 10, 2017

Dr. Hernán Tala es endocrinólogo de la Clinica Alemana en Santiago, Chile. Su area especialidad incluye cáncer de tiroides avanzado, endocrinologia general, y enfermedades tiroides.

Los temas presentados incluyen:

  • Una mejor comprensión de la biología del cáncer de tiroides, y que no todo el cáncer de tiroides es igual. La enfermedad es única en cada paciente.
  • La importancia de entender el perfil del cáncer en cada paciente.
  • Diagnóstico del nódulo.
  • Perfil molecular del nódulo tiroideo.
  • Una pausa en la exploración universal del cáncer de tiroides.
  • Vigilancia activa
  • Menos radiación, o ningún tratamiento de radiación en los casos que anteriormente recibirían radiación
  • La importancia para los médicos de compartir una comprensión universal de la vigilancia activa, por lo que los pacientes obtener una recomendación coherente.
  • Hipotiroidismo en pacientes con tiroidectomía total.
  • El cáncer de tiroides es lento en comparación con otros tipos de cáncer.
  • Qué se requiere para la adopción adicional de la innovación del tratamiento del cáncer de tiroides.
  • Los riesgos de la cirugía de la tiroides.

REFERENCIA:

Clinica Aleman

Dr. Hernán Tala

Facebook

American Thyroid Association (español)

35: Rethinking Thyroid Cancer – When Saying No to Surgery Maybe Best for You with Dr. Allen Ho

21: Diagnosed with Thyroid Cancer and You Say No to Surgery with Dr. Louise Davies

41: Molecular Profiling and Unnecessary Thyroid Surgeries with Jennifer Kuo from Columbia University

 

Aug 6, 2017

This episode is recorded from Boston and the World Congress on Thyroid Cancer, where leading doctors and researchers have gathered to share the latest medical research and trends related to thyroid disease. 

At the Congress, Dr. Okamoto presented on Thyroid Cancer Guidelines Around the World

He helped write the Japanese guidelines on thyroid cancer.  He is Professor & Chair of the Department of Surgery at Tokyo Women’s Medical University. 

Key points from this episode include:

  • Most Western countries carry out total thyroidectomies, whereas in Japan, the approach is more conservative with a fundamental practice of hemithyroidectomy whenever possible.
  • By not doing a total thyroidectomy, this allows the patient to not avoid taking thyroid replacement medication.
  • Complete thyroidectomy is conducted when 80-90% of lymph nodes have metastasis.
  • I-131 treatment is decreasing despite cases of cancer increasing
  • For I-131 treatment, patients wait more than 6 months post surgery.
  • When receving I-131 treatment, patients be admitted to hospital for several days.
  • TSH suppression therapy is common in Western countries, whereas in Japan, measures are taken to avoid TSH suppression by not removing all of the thyroid.
  • Normal TSH in Japan is 4.3 or less.
  • Culturally, Japanese patients are typically conservative compared to Western countries.  Even high risk patients opt for no TT.
  • In Japan people are less aggressive and more patient as a culture, and this is reflected in their approach to treating thyroid cancer.
  • For medullary thyroid cancer, treatment management differs in japan.  In Westerm countries, they receive TT.  But, in Japan, if its not familial it is treated with hemithyrodectmy.  Only when familial, is it treated with TT.
  • Calcitonin
  • Follicular diagnosis is difficult, benign and malignant is a big issue. 
  • Active surveillance is spreading now, the question is why?  We must consider the patient’s view.  Research from Japan focuses on the size of tumor, but must consider patient’s view. 

NOTES

Book: Treatment of Thyroid Tumor: Japanese Clinical Guidelines

American Thyroid Association

RELATED EPISODES

38: Thyroid Surgery? Be Careful, Not All Surgeons Are Equal and Here is Why

35: Rethinking Thyroid Cancer – When Saying No to Surgery Maybe Best for You

6: A Must Listen Episode Before Getting Surgery – Do Not Do It Alone

 

 

Aug 1, 2017

This episode is recorded from Boston at the World Congress on Thyroid Cancer, where thyroid doctors and researchers gathered to share the latest medical research and medical improvements related to thyroid disease. 

Dr. Özer Makay is an expert in nerve monitoring during thyroid surgery, and has been a guest faculty member in South Korea, Italy, France, the Netherlands, Germany, Belgium and Bulgaria. 

He has received 17 awards and honors for his scientific studies.  He has authored a 300-page book on nerve monitoring during thyroid surgery. 

This episode covers the following topics:

  • Protecting the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) and superior laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery.
  • Outcomes of damaging these nerves during surgery include no voice, hoarseness, shortness of breath, problem with drinking water or aspiration, impaired physical exertion with something as simple as climbing a flight of stairs.
  • Why some centers have a higher occurrence of damage during thyroid surgery and include an error rate as high as 10%
  • The cause of the damaged nerve include stretching or traction, and cutting or stitching.
  • How to reduce risk.
  • Is it possible to reattach a cut nerve?
  • Surgeons who are opponents of using a nerve monitor.
  • Pitfalls of using nerve monitoring. 

Also discussed are thyroid cancer trends in Turkey including:

  • Incidence being in the top 5 in the world.
  • Now the number one cancer for women.
  • Proximity to Chernobyl.
  • Screening and awareness as a reason for the increase.
  • 50% of population has a thyroid nodule.In the words of Dr. Özer Makay

Biography:  In the words of Dr. Özer Makay

I was born in 1974 in the Netherlands. After finishing the primary school there, I completed my secondary and high school educations at Bornova Anatolian High School in Izmir/Turkey. I graduated from Ege University, School of Medicine and started my residency at the General Surgery Department of Ege University, School of Medicine. During my studentship, I did my surgical internship at London King’s College Hospital. During my surgical residency, in 2002, I received education regarding “Laparoscopic Surgery” at Free University Hospital, Amsterdam from Prof. Miguel Cuesta and carried out scientific studies there. I had the opportunity to meet with the robotic surgery system here and did use this system at the experimental investigation laboratory.

After being a specialist registrar in May 2005, I started to work at the division of “Endocrine Surgery” of the General Surgery Department of Ege University. During my fellowship, I worked under the supervision of Prof. Enis Yetkin, Prof. Mahir Akyıldız and Prof. Gökhan İçöz. During this period, I became the first Turkish surgeon to have the right to get the title “Fellow of European Board of Surgery – div. Endocine Surgery” by passing the “UEMS Board Examination for Endocrine Surgery”. At the Ege University, we started the “Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy Programme’ in 2008, together with Prof. Dr. Mahir Akyıldız. Besides, the “Robotic Surgery Programme’ was launched in 2012. I promoted to “Associate Professor of Surgery” in 2012. I have been invited to become a member of the European Board of Endocrine Surgery Committee. This makes me the first Turkish member of this committee. Besides, I was chosen as “the national representative” of a “European Union Health Project” concerning this area.

To date, I own more than 80 national and international publications. Furthermore, I participated in more than 30 national and international scientific meetings as speaker, instructor and guest surgeon. I served as president, scientific secretary or organization/scientific committee member for national and international congresses and meetings. I had been in South Korea, Italy, France, the Netherlands, Germany, Belgium and Bulgaria as guest faculty member. I received 17 awards and honors because of my scientific studies presented during national and international scientific congresses. I speak English, Dutch and German fluently and Spanish at elementary level.

My essential areas of interests are “endocrine surgery” and “robotic surgery”. As Ege University, we are the most experienced center of our country regarding “robotic adrenalectomy”.

NOTES

Dr. Özer Makay

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